Type 2 Diabetes plagues the United States, but is even more rampant in many developing countries, triggered in large part by a shift to less healthy nutritional habits and increasingly sedentary lifestyles, all fueled by the drive of rapid urbanization and economic growth. Asia is one of the largest epicenters of this disease, with an estimated 60 percent of the world’s diabetes patients living in that region.
Indian gooseberry is one of the richest sources of vitamin C. When mixed with bitter gourd juice, its efficacy manifolds, and it can prove to be a highly effective concoction against diabetes. The mixture arouses the islets of Langerhans, that is, the isolated group of cells that secrete the hormone insulin in the pancreas. Just consume one tablespoon of Indian gooseberry juice mixed with one cup of bitter gourd juice daily for 8 to 12 weeks. It is recommended to take it first thing in the morning, if possible. The mixture has also been found to trigger insulin production. All in all, a great herbal remedy for diabetes.

In that analysis, the Khan study looks like an outlier. More studies have emerged since then: Crawford in 2009 found 1g of cinnamon per day reduced A1C levels compared to placebo. Suppapitiporn found no effect on any measure with 1.5g per day. Akilen, in 2010, found an effect with 2g per day. Another meta-analysis, published in 2012 and included 6 studies, concluded the opposite of Baker, and made positive conclusions:


They would often say to me, “Doctor. You’ve always said that weight loss is the key to reversing diabetes. Yet you prescribed me a drug that made me gain 25 pounds. How is that good?” I never had a good answer, because none existed. It was not good. The key was weight loss, whereupon the diabetes often goes away or at least gets significantly better. So, logically, insulin does not help reverse the disease, but actually worsens it.
According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America.

Normally, blood glucose levels are tightly controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin lowers the blood glucose level. When the blood glucose elevates (for example, after eating food), insulin is released from the pancreas. This release of insulin promotes the uptake of glucose into body cells. In patients with diabetes, the absence of insufficient production of or lack of response to insulin causes hyperglycemia. Diabetes is a chronic medical condition, meaning that although it can be controlled, it lasts a lifetime.
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