When you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you need to be very aware of not only what you eat, but also when and how much you eat. A Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) at Joslin can work with you to develop a healthy meal plan that fits your lifestyle. Following a meal plan can also help you lose weight and lower your risk of developing complications.
“Basic principles of good health like eating right, exercising regularly, and maintaining a healthy weight can be as effective as medicine in the management of type 2 diabetes for most people,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, CDE, lead medical nutrition therapist at Nebraska Medicine in Omaha. That's backed up by the Look AHEAD study, a large clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The researchers found that over a four-year period, changes like eating a healthier diet and getting more exercise led to weight loss and improved diabetes control in 5,000 overweight or obese participants with type 2 diabetes.

So you go to your doctor. What does he do? Instead of getting rid of the toxic sugar load, he doubles the dose of the medication. If the luggage doesn’t close, the solution is to empty it out, not use more force to . The higher dose of medication helps, but only for a time. Blood sugars go down as you force your body to gag down even more sugar. But eventually, this dose fails as well. So then your doctor gives you a second medication, then a third one and then eventually insulin injections.
Until the findings are reproduced consistently, and cinnamon has been show to provide a meaningful improvement in relevant measures, there is no persuasive evidence to suggest that cinnamon has potential as a useful treatment option. Drugs that work, work consistently and provide meaningful improvements in measures of the disease. Why doesn’t cinnamon work?  There may be an active ingredient, but it’s present in low concentrations, and varies in content between the different batches of cinnamon used in the different trials. In that case, the active ingredient needs to be standardized and possibly isolated, which would make it a drug treatment.  Or this could be yet another example of a supplement that looks promising in early studies, only to see the effect disappear as the trials get larger and control for bias more effectively.
If I could only prescribe one supplement for a diabetes patient, I would prescribe R-alpha-lipoic acid. Alpha-lipoic acid has numerous benefits to the diabetic patient. It is a water- and fat-soluble antioxidant and has been shown to protect patients with fatty liver from liver disease progression. It can help reduce insulin resistance and has been shown to protect people with diabetes from developing complications in their nerves, eyes, and kidneys. R-ALA can prevent glycosylation of proteins, which reduces the A1C level. It is safe, although very rarely it can cause stomach upset. Alpha-lipoic acid is listed either as ALA or R-ALA. When listed as ALA, this means it contains two forms—the S isomer form and the R isomer form, in a 50:50 ratio. The key is to find a product that says it contains “R-ALA” instead of just “ALA.” A good daily working dose of R-ALA is 300 to 1,200 mg a day, which is the equivalent of 600 to 2,400 mg a day of regular ALA, if you buy a regular ALA listed product.
Dr. Sarah Hallberg is a Medical Director at Virta Health. She also created the Medically Supervised Weight Loss Program at Indiana University Health Arnett and serves as its Medical Director. She is an adjunct Clinical Professor of Medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. Hallberg is an expert in diabetes care and is board certified in Internal Medicine, Obesity Medicine, and Clinical Lipidology and also a Registered Clinical Exercise Physiologist from the ACSM.
I do not believe it can be an actual reversal, more of a remission. If no longer needing medication to control blood sugar looks like reversal it is only possible if the person maintains regular exercise and a healthy weight. The length of time one has diabetes plays a role as does one’s genes. There are some thin people who have type 2 diabetes due to heredity.
I agree with the group consensus. Type 2 diabetes can be reversed, or controlled, as long as the prescription sticks. Many people don’t know this and the word needs to be spread! I’ve worked with patients who have been able to reach a healthy BMI and eliminate the need for medications to treat type 2 diabetes after adopting a plant-based diet. A prescription to focus on increasing fiber intake (http://www.pcrm.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/health/dietary-fiber-checklist.pdf) instead of counting carbohydrates makes it easy to add, instead of subtract, from each meal. It’s a win-win for both patients and providers.
Diabetes is a growing global epidemic that affects millions of people worldwide, but recent studies on various natural remedies for diabetes provide hope for reversing this disease. From adopting a fasting-mimicking diet to incorporating superfoods like spirulina and ginseng, there are lots of natural options that provide long-lasting results. Committing to healthy choices and positive lifestyle changes has helped many people overcome the disease, proving that Diabetes does not have to be a life sentence.
Given the prevalence of diabetes and the chronic nature of the disease, it’s no surprise that CAM is a popular treatment option. I don’t see a lot of CAM use in Type 1 diabetics. Insulin is the primary treatment, it works well, and patients can objectively measure their own blood sugar. Type 1 diabetics don’t seem to experiment with supplements that might alter their blood sugars. Those patients end up hospitalized or dead.
Like the sulfonylureas, meglitinides is a class of drugs that work by promoting insulin secretion from the pancreas. Unlike the sulfonylureas, which last longer in the body, repaglinide (Prandin) and nateglinide (Starlix) are very short acting, with peak effects within one hour. For this reason, they are given up to three times a day just before meals.
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